Hugar

New Icelandic band consisting of Bergur Þórisson & Pétur Jónsson.

On their debut album they are joined by Ólafur Arnalds on drums as well as a string quartet composed of:
Pétur Björnsson - Violin
Sólveig Vaka Eyþórsdóttir - Violin
Guðbjartur Hákonarson - Viola
Hrafnhildur Marta Guðmundsdóttir - Cello

and it’s awesome

(Source: wronghands1.wordpress.com, via ilovecharts)

(Source: na-podacha, via thetypologist)

Rushes for Seven Bassoons by Michael Gordon

Beautiful, shimmering, beating chords. Slippery, church-like, eerie ethereal.

If I just heard it and didn’t know who was playing, it wouldn’t seem so different from a lot of electronic ambient music.

Absolutely gorgeous.

Giya Kancheli : Valse Boston (1996)

with Dennis Russell Davies on piano

polaroidsf:

Bob’s Donuts, thankfully still going strong. If this place ever closes, San Francisco is officially over.

there’s only a few places in San Francisco to get a donut at any hour of the night, and this is certainly the best.

polaroidsf:

Bob’s Donuts, thankfully still going strong. If this place ever closes, San Francisco is officially over.

there’s only a few places in San Francisco to get a donut at any hour of the night, and this is certainly the best.

(via batteredshoes)

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday Elasmosaurus. Elasmosaurus was about 46 ft (14 m) in length with 71 neck vertebrae. 
© The Field Museum, CSGEO17657.
Elasmosaurus shoulder girdle, nearly complete right paddle, pelvic girdles, and vertebrae. Fossils. Geology specimen P12009. 
(There are a lot of girdles mentioned in this caption.)
8x10 negative
1906 

when I was in grammar school, probably 2nd grade, we had a giant picture book and an accompanying LP—mostly narration and Godzilla-like sound effects, and some songs—about dinosaurs. 
The only two details I remember are that there was a bell sound between tracks when the teacher was supposed to turn the page of the giant picture book, and I remember the melody of the song about the Elasmosaurus.
Strange days.

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday Elasmosaurus. Elasmosaurus was about 46 ft (14 m) in length with 71 neck vertebrae

© The Field Museum, CSGEO17657.

Elasmosaurus shoulder girdle, nearly complete right paddle, pelvic girdles, and vertebrae. Fossils. Geology specimen P12009.

(There are a lot of girdles mentioned in this caption.)

8x10 negative

1906 

when I was in grammar school, probably 2nd grade, we had a giant picture book and an accompanying LP—mostly narration and Godzilla-like sound effects, and some songs—about dinosaurs.

The only two details I remember are that there was a bell sound between tracks when the teacher was supposed to turn the page of the giant picture book, and I remember the melody of the song about the Elasmosaurus.

Strange days.

lincolncenter:

Every summer, Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall is transformed into a specific space for the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, the centerpiece of the Mostly Mozart Festival, which begins tonight. In 2011, we made a time-lapse video of the incredible work that goes on to change over the hall. Enjoy!

eventjoeproject:

The Influence of The Vinyl Press ~>

A look at some of the machines used to create vinyl records throughout the years.

(via rockhalllibrary)

oboesapien:

When I listen to classical music in the car my hand is basically always on the volume knob due to dynamics. I swear I’m going to get to a fucking sforzando one day and crash. 

It’s true! I was listening to something last week and the guy in the car next to mine jumped.

(via devilishlyoperatic)